The Club de Mujeres Mexicanas

Justo A. Martí Photographic Collection, 1948-1985

Club de Mujeres Mexicanas members, New York, NY. As Mexican immigrants grew in number, groups began to emerge as part of an established society, such as the Club Mujeres Mexicanas. The existence of the club also demonstrated the strength of Mexican women and their ability to assert a sense of community and identity for themselves. Programs such the Mexican Farm Labor Program Agreement (Bracero program) of 1942 between the United States and Mexican government encouraged a mass movement of people from Mexico to the U.S. Continuing until 1962, the Bracero program was an attempt by the U.S. to legalize and control Mexican migrant farmworkers, touted as a temporary solution to a need for manual labor during World War II. Many braceros remained in the US after the program ended, finding other employment, developing communities and establishing a presence. The Club Mujeres Mexicanas spoke to the emergence of Mexicans as an established society, and not a recent phenomena, but also offered a commentary on the strength of Mexican women and their ability to assert a sense of community and identity for themselves.


Creator
Justo A. Martí
Document Type
Photograph: b & w photographs
Identifier
JAMa_b16_f02_0001
Related Keywords
Community-based organizations, Identity, Latino affairs, Leaders, Migrants
Citation
Justo A. Martí Photographic Collection, 1948-1985. The Club de Mujeres Mexicanas: JAMa_b16_f02_0001. Center for Puerto Rican Studies Library & Archives, Hunter College, CUNY. Web. 22 Sep 2019.
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Rights Holder
Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Library & Archive
Repository
Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Library and Archives
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